FBMH Stories: Natasha Wetton

img_3679As part of our #FBMHstories series for Instagram, we caught up with Natasha, a BSc Speech and Language Therapy student who told us all about her experience studying at the Faculty and the University as a whole.

Why did you choose to study at The University of Manchester?

I chose to study here because I like the city, it’s not too far from where I live and I really like the campus and the buildings. The general feel is really nice.

What is the best thing about your course?

The people! They’re a really nice group to work with and it’s quite a small course, so you get to know each other really well. The lecturers are really nice, there are good resources and great opportunities.

It is interesting learning the stuff on the course as well – I like learning about anatomy and physiology, how the body works and how things can go wrong in that sense.

It is interesting learning about how you can help people fix problems with their speech and language. 

What are you hoping to do following your studies?

I want to be a speech and language therapist, although I could change my mind. I’d maybe work with adults who have speech difficulties when they have had strokes. I had voluntary experience working with people who have had strokes so I feel like I know it quite well.

It’s interesting because everyone is unique and it’s nice to help people who feel like they don’t have a chance to get back to normality — it’s nice to show them that there’s hope and they can develop language skills again.

Would you recommend your course to others?

I would – it is a good course to be on. Other universities have their own clinics on campus, but Manchester has established lecturers who do their own research.

What aspect of your placement are you most looking forward to?

I’m looking forward to actually working with people. The course is very theory based, you know — it makes it feel more worthwhile when you get to talk to people and actually help them. It’s nice to get to know people, talk to them and realise you can do it!

What is your favourite thing to do in Manchester?

I like exploring the city, going shopping and going to the galleries. There is a good music scene and it’s fun to go clubbing.

In Manchester, there is always so much going on. I’m from a small city which is quite boring. When I moved to Manchester it was like, “wow there’s a world out there!”

Where is your favourite place on campus?

I like the old bit — the quadrangle. It’s nice to take pictures there for Instagram. The buildings are really classic. Ali G [Alan Gilbert Learning Commons] is a really good place to work. It’s a nice campus to walk around.

Do you have any advice for prospective students thinking about taking your course?

Don’t worry — uni seems intimidating at the start; there’s a lot to learn and get the hang of, but just stick at it! Keep trying your best and slowly but surely things will start to make sense.

Take time to enjoy the uni experience too. Don’t spend your whole life with your head in a book. Enjoy learning but explore the city, do lots of activities and find that balance.

Sports activities are good. It’s nice to be part of a team — there’s a life beyond your course. It’s also good to make friends outside your course. If any societies take your interest, just join them – there are lots of opportunities at The University of Manchester.

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To see more #FBMHstories, follow the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health on Instagram.

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If you’re a current student who would like to be profiled on our blog, please contact us.

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